Help a Writer Out

Hello WordPress community and people of the internet! I am working on a short story, and could use some help writing about the worst night out ever.

worst night

Please, share your stories – your personal stories, or a friend’s, or perhaps crazy things you’ve read on the internet. Right now, my scene is a little dull, so I’m looking for inspiration to make it better.

embarrass

Thank you for taking the time to read this post; I hope to read your comments soon!

A Quote I Like from Fight Club

‘Why should I believe any of this?’

It happens that fast..

I say, because I think I like you.

Marla says, ‘Not love?’

This is a cheesy enough moment, I say. Don’t push it.

Chuck Palahniuk does a great job of writing about subject matter in a way that remains interesting, and never gets too sappy. Some might argue he occasionally goes too far in the other direction (I do not agree with this assessment, but everyone is entitled to their own opinion).

I just finished Fight Club, including the Afterword in my version, and find it interesting that the author considers this book a love story. There are many elements to Fight Club, but if I had to write a paper about themes/meanings/etc. of the novel afterward, I never would have thought to write that it is a romance. Actually, I still wouldn’t, even now that I know it is his intention.

He also mentions that he essentially considers Fight Club a re-write of The Great Gatsby. Also interesting, because I don’t know that I would classify The Great Gatsby as primarily a love story, either.

Thoughts? What do you think of this quote? What do you think of Fight Club (book or movie)?

Fate is blind?

One individual brave enough to even give us his name (if that’s his real name) has posted an advertisement on Craigslist:

fate is blind #questionmark

First of all, this guy is really into music. He mentions wanting to watch “The Sound of Music,” which is a really long date movie, and mentions he wants a girl who will “sing with” him. I have to wonder, is this relationship feasible if she’s tone deaf?

But even more interesting, to me, is his comment at the end: “…let’s email and see if fate is really blind.” Is that a thing? I know they say justice is blind, but did not realize that people said fate is blind, too.

Regardless, I hope you find your “missed connection,” Brian.

R.L. Stine – Don’t Pretend You Didn’t Read Him

I recently stumbled across this short, brief interview with children’s horror writer R.L. Stine. These are two excerpts from the interview I want to keep/remember:

When you write, for example, about a hideous mask that the heroine can’t take off, are you writing about some deeper theme?

I didn’t really think of that. When my son was little, he was trying on a green Frankenstein mask and he was pulling it down over his face and he couldn’t get it off. And he was tugging, tugging. I thought, “What a great idea for a story.” I should’ve helped him. I wasn’t a good parent that day.

I love his commentary, “I wasn’t a good parent that day.” We all have those moments.

What do kids say when they write to you?

That’s one of the best parts of writing for kids. I get wonderful mail, tons and tons. Here’s a couple classic letters:

“Dear R.L. Stine, I really love your books but can you answer one question, why don’t the endings make any sense?”

“Dear R.L. Stine, I’m huge fan of your books. Your friends and family are proud of you, no matter what anybody says.”

“Dear R.L. Stine, I’ve read 40 of your books and I think they’re really boring.”

That’s my favorite.

Kids are hilarious.

FURIOUSLY HAPPY. And scared. And back to happy again.

I can add nothing poignant to this post. But you should read it.

The Bloggess

If you’ve been here long enough you know I’ve been working on my second book for the last three years.  I’ve carried it with me every day, adding a paragraph here, deleting another there, reworking a sentence for the eleventieth time because I want it to be perfect, always feeling like a loser because Stephen King and cocaine set unrealistic expectations about how easy it should be to write a book.  If you know me in real life you’ve seen me lugging around a giant manuscript and scribbling furiously in it when inspiration strikes.  You may have asked me why I don’t just use a laptop and then nodded in what you hoped passed for understanding when I explained that I was afraid I’d lose everything I’ve written when the robot revolution happens and computers become self-aware and refuse to humor me anymore because I wasted their potential watching videos of baby hedgehogs in bathtubs.

When I was deciding…

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Dreams & Demons & Other Normal Teen Nonsense

Sappy movies based on fairy tales tell us that our dreams really can come true, if we are very good little boys and girls, and we want them badly enough. But what if you wanted your dreams badly enough to summon a demon? This idea provides the backdrop for Kerstin Gier’s Dream a Little Dream, the first book of the Silver Trilogy.

Personally, I think this is a terrible cover. & why are you showing me the protagonist's face? That's what I have this little thing called "imagination" for...

Personally, I think this is a terrible cover. & why are you showing me the protagonist’s face? That’s what I have this little thing called “imagination” for…

Olivia and her sister are constantly having to move for their somewhat selfish mother, a traveling professor, whose most recent gig is at Oxford. Arriving from the airport to discover their mother has been getting bizz-ay (bom chicka wow-wow) in their absence with an older, balding gentleman, while they’ve been in Switzerland enjoying stinky cheeses with their dad, Olivia and Mia are, to say the least, not happy about it. The book reads quickly and easily, but it’s just a bit bland. Bland The storyline’s actually not that bad. Liv moves to London, and meets a group of super hot upperclassmen who are just normal popular guys. You know, good at basketball, flirting/teasing/ignoring all the girls, and, oh yeah, getting drunk and summoning demons. You know, just boring, normal activities that teenage boys engage in.

...no big thing

…no big thing

Protagonist Liv is really annoying. Although she’s supposed to be a teenager, she often talks like a middle-aged woman. She fits in well with this demon circle because she can access this funky dream hallway and she’s never held hands with a boy, much less had sex with him.

Briefly seen in this other cover version, which I like much better, and hope they use.

The dream hallway: briefly seen in this other cover version, which I like much better, and hope they use.

The virginal aspect, while a common theme in at least literary demonic rites (I’ll be honest, I’m not very knowledgeable about real ones), also really annoyed me. I don’t have a problem with a girl waiting to have sex, but I also don’t have a problem with a girl having sex. This aspect of the book felt a bit slut-shaming to me, which I did not appreciate. Our protagonist is not a “good” girl because she’s never been kissed before; she’s a girl who still pretends boys have cooties. Again, this is fine, it just doesn’t make her a better person than a girl who likes to go on dates and kiss her lipstick off.

Not advocating changing for a guy; just saying that both Sandys are equally lovely.

Not advocating changing for a guy; just saying that both Sandys are equally lovely.

The book picks up in the last twenty pages or so, ending on a cliffhanger that can be seen from a mile away, but resolving the main mystery rather nicely (except for further madonna-whore complex bullshit). The entire book, the protagonist has been fighting the idea of the existence of demons while simultaneously being able to invade the dreams of others via the dream hallway, so how do we reconcile this? Well, it’s not entirely reconciled, because this is a series, after all, and Gier has to keep you reading. Still, the ending was a bit above the rest of the book.

cliffhanger

On my arbitrary scale of book ratings, I give this book: melted ice cream. It’s okay, and I’ll still read it, but it’s not as delicious and far more messy than I would prefer.

Meh. It's okay.

Meh. It’s okay.