R.L. Stine – Don’t Pretend You Didn’t Read Him

I recently stumbled across this short, brief interview with children’s horror writer R.L. Stine. These are two excerpts from the interview I want to keep/remember:

When you write, for example, about a hideous mask that the heroine can’t take off, are you writing about some deeper theme?

I didn’t really think of that. When my son was little, he was trying on a green Frankenstein mask and he was pulling it down over his face and he couldn’t get it off. And he was tugging, tugging. I thought, “What a great idea for a story.” I should’ve helped him. I wasn’t a good parent that day.

I love his commentary, “I wasn’t a good parent that day.” We all have those moments.

What do kids say when they write to you?

That’s one of the best parts of writing for kids. I get wonderful mail, tons and tons. Here’s a couple classic letters:

“Dear R.L. Stine, I really love your books but can you answer one question, why don’t the endings make any sense?”

“Dear R.L. Stine, I’m huge fan of your books. Your friends and family are proud of you, no matter what anybody says.”

“Dear R.L. Stine, I’ve read 40 of your books and I think they’re really boring.”

That’s my favorite.

Kids are hilarious.

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Classic Books Annotated by Famous Authors

Do you write in your books? A powerful argument for physical copies of books. Sure, you can take notes in e-readers, but not quite in the same way…

Flavorwire

Readers come in two editions: those who write in their books, and those who don’t. No matter which you are on your own time, there’s great pleasure to be found in paging through marked-up copies of other people’s books — particularly when the original owners were famous writers themselves. Whether scribbled or printed, snide or appreciative, an author’s annotations give equal insight into the book and the reader, and double as yet another reason to buy physical books. After the jump, check out the marginalia in the books of a few great authors, and add any stellar examples you find missing in the comments.

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Help Write a Novel

Sounds like so much fun! e-mail rabbitholesalice@gmail.com to add at least a sentence to a novel.

Alice will write a sentence, e-mail the sentence to someone at random. That writer writes the next sentence, which is e-mailed back to Alice.

It could be a mess; it could be amazing — but I definitely think it is a fun idea worth exploring.

Check out Alice’s blog post below, then e-mail her today:

An idea was born.

We can all write a sentence! w00t

We can all write a sentence! w00t

Writing Comp. to Check Out

Beth’s Brilliant Books is running a short story competition.

It can only be up to 500 words, and must make her laugh.

I think writing contests are awesome. They give you a deadline to work towards, some type of guidelines to abide by, and generally have kick-ass prizes to encourage you to write well so you can win!

Click on the link below for more info if you’re interested:

Competition!

Let your saucy side show in a piece of witty, humorous writing

Let your saucy side show in a piece of witty, humorous writing

Repost: Writing & Setting Goals

This is a great post that details the importance of setting goals, as well as providing the opportunity to show initiative by joining a goal-setting group this month! (Also, it’s well-written, researched, & funny.)

Day 1: Three Things to Know About Setting Writing Goals.

I won’t be participating this year, but I love the idea. I strongly believe in setting goals, though I am unable to focus on writing, at the moment. Please let me know if you’re setting any writing goals in the comments!

And remember:

goal v. dream