I’m Done with Microeconomics!

I'm Done with Microeconomics!

This is what I look like. I’m so happy, I literally look like 2 people dancing.

I wonder how many people I will resemble once Intermediate Accounting is over…

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A Day In the Life of Sleep-Deprived Parents: Math Skills

I love that I can share this here, because it’s anonymous. This conversation occurred the other day, while Baby Boy & I were getting ready to take Papa Bear to work. I had just finished strapping Baby Boy into his car seat (a difficult maneuver; baby wrangling should be an Olympic sport), when:

Papa Bear: We are so much stronger now.

Me: (positioning the handlebar of the car seat, on which is strapped a toyband that Baby Boy finds amazing) What do you mean?

Papa Bear: Remember when we first came home from the hospital, how heavy the car seat was?

Me: Oh, yeah…

Papa Bear: And H- was then only, what? Just over 6 pounds? That car seat must weight about twice as much now!

I began laughing at this, since Papa Bear recently took Baby Boy for his 9-month check-up, where the scales showed Henry is now over 20 pounds.

6 x 2 = 20

You learn something new every day.

Book Review: Big Girl Panties

I requested this ARC solely for the title.

big girl panties

It arrived a couple of days before my two accounting finals, and I gave a great sigh of relief, because a romance that doesn’t make you think sounded like the perfect relief after the stress of end-of-the-semester. (This review, btw, is belated – I am once again in the midst of school stress with 2 summer semester classes.)

Aw - a mindless romance, for me? You shouldn't have...

Aw – a mindless romance, for me? You shouldn’t have…

Except…that’s not exactly what this book was. This book goes a little outside of the romance formula – but at the same time, doesn’t go far enough. It made me think more than I was expecting, which isn’t a bad thing – but I wish the author had put a bit more thought into the novel, as well.

Enough of vague abstractions! Let’s discuss what the book is about.

The viewpoint? Third person. The narrator tends to sympathize/get inside the heads of Holly Brennan and Logan Montgomery.

Who the hell are they? Holly is an overweight young widow with severe self-esteem issues who ends up seated next to Logan Montgomery on a plane. Logan Montgomery is one of the best personal trainers around. He regularly trains athletes, has two amazing fitness studios he tends to work from, and he offers Holly classes to redeem himself from displaying obvious disgust that a fattie sat down next to him on a plane.

So – obviously they get together? *Spoiler alert!*

Untitled

Was it any good? Surprisingly, it was. I liked the fact that the characters were different. The “famous,” really good-looking guy was a personal trainer, instead of a movie star, etc. People stared at him, because he was ripped and handsome, but he wasn’t always pissing & moaning about paparazzi, and the trials of being rich (which may be real, but don’t really compare to the trials of being poor and, you know, being in danger of going without food, a home, etc.). And having an overweight female protagonist was refreshing.

The whole “she’s overweight but she’s so smart & funny” thing, however, seemed a bit overdone. Holly’s self-deprecating humor wasn’t horrible – but I doubt everyone would find it an enchanting reason to hang out with an overweight person. More likely, it would make a lot of people uncomfortable to hear her say things that at least some of them are already thinking.

And after Logan and Holly have passionate sex pretty much everywhere in existence, and Logan has realized that he at least like likes her, he still feels uncomfortable being seen out with her in public. More uncomfortable, in fact, than he did when they were out in public before they began having copious amounts of sex.

He might as well be wearing one of these...

He might as well be wearing one of these…

*Spoiler Alert*

This feeling of being uncomfortable ends up being played off as “Oh, Logan’s not really uncomfortable with the fact that Holly is still a larger woman, he’s uncomfortable with the idea of commitment.”

Um – bullshit. The author just wanted her happy ending, and tried to pull some Freudian rabbit out of her hat.

The thing is, the book would have been so much better if Holly had realized it, but also realized that she was a healthier, happier person because of the confidence Logan had helped her build. And then realized that she didn’t need the man Logan himself, but that didn’t mean that the health and confidence needed to be abandoned with him.

Instead, you get your cliche happy ending, which feels hollow and less than satisfying.

But at least we are left with the knowledge that Holly is getting lots of great sex…

So not as satisfying as the 1995 P&P miniseries...

So not as satisfying as the 1995 P&P miniseries…

Classic Books Annotated by Famous Authors

Do you write in your books? A powerful argument for physical copies of books. Sure, you can take notes in e-readers, but not quite in the same way…

Flavorwire

Readers come in two editions: those who write in their books, and those who don’t. No matter which you are on your own time, there’s great pleasure to be found in paging through marked-up copies of other people’s books — particularly when the original owners were famous writers themselves. Whether scribbled or printed, snide or appreciative, an author’s annotations give equal insight into the book and the reader, and double as yet another reason to buy physical books. After the jump, check out the marginalia in the books of a few great authors, and add any stellar examples you find missing in the comments.

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